Thunder Bay approves pilot project to deal with feral cats

City council is moving ahead with a six-month pilot project aimed at controlling the feral cat population in Thunder Bay.

City hopes program will reduce feline population, save citizens money in the long run

The city's supervisor for animal services, Jody Kondrat, left, and Emily Hopkins with Superior Street Cats made their case for the six-month feral cat pilot project. (Jeff Walter/CBC)

City council is moving ahead with a six-month pilot project aimed at controlling the feral cat population in Thunder Bay.

The project, approved by councillors Monday night, comes with a $13,000 price tag. The city intends on trapping, neutering and releasing stray cats with the help of volunteers and veterinarians. 

Volunteers will trap the cats, bring them to vets for sterilization and return them to their cat colonies. 

The goal is to have cats in their colonies "age out," while also living healthy and happy lives.

"The majority of cats in shelters are feral and stray," said Emily Hopkins with Superior Street Cats, the group behind the program.

"Last year, over 800 cats were euthanized by animal services, costing $15,000 for the euthanasia portion alone." 

The city hopes the program will end up saving taxpayers some money as the cat population declines with more felines becoming sterile. 

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.