Thunder Bay

Mating pheromone in biopesticide could reduce sea lamprey numbers in Lake Superior

A new biopesticide, containing a synthetic mating pheromone to attract sea lamprey, could decrease the population of the invasive species in Lake Superior.

Synthetic mating pheromone for sea lamprey approved for use in United States

(www.invadingspecies.com)

A new biopesticide, containing a synthetic mating pheromone to attract sea lamprey, could decrease the population of the invasive species in Lake Superior.

The Great Lakes Fishery Commission says the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has registered the pheromone, which can be used as bait in traps that collect and remove adult sea lampreys before they have a chance to spawn.

The goal is to reduce the lamprey population, said Marc Gadon of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission.

"We have a new tool potentially in our arsenal to control lamprey. And, it's a big deal to us because we want to try and find as many weapons as possible to keep this destructive beast under control," said Gadon.

The approval of this pheromone is important, as it could pave the way for using similar biopesticides to decrease the population of other invasive species, such as Asian carp, in a variety of waterways.

The biopesticide is not yet approved in Canada, but Gadon said he expects that to happen soon.

Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency is in the process of registering the mating pheromone for use in Canada.

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