Thunder Bay

Ontario SPCA brings veterinary care on the road

A new mobile veterinary clinic is already helping to address pet overpopulation in the province, the Ontario SPCA said.

New Mobile Animal Wellness Services trailer visited Northwestern Ontario last week

The new Ontario SPCA Mobile Animal Wellness Services trailer visited Thunder Bay last week. (Submitted)

A new mobile veterinary clinic is already helping to address pet overpopulation in the province, the Ontario SPCA said.

The agency launched its new Mobile Animal Wellness Services trailer in the spring. The trailer is equipped to offer services like spaying, neutering, vaccinations, and general animal health checks in communities without access to vet care.

"Since we've started with this new mobile unit, we were able to deliver over 350 surgeries, which really is preventing puppies and kittens from being born to the tune of over 13,000," said Judi Cannon, director of partnership and community outreach with the OSPCA.

"The impact is great, far and wide, from north to south," Cannon said. "But, super-excited to be able to deliver services in the north to communities in need."

Cannon said the trailer will be based in southern Ontario during the winter. However, it will spend the warmer months on the road, visiting communities across the province.

"We're really helping where the need is," she said. "This is a tool to continue our mission and vision to really combat the pet overpopulation challenge that we have here in Ontario."

The trailer made a stop in Thunder Bay on Friday, after running a two-day clinic in Naicatchewenin First Nation, north of Fort Frances earlier in the week.

While in Thunder Bay, the mobile unit wasn't providing services to pets, but was open to the public for tours instead.

Communities interested in hosting the trailer in the future can do so through the OSPCA Mobile Animal Wellness Services web page.

"We basically bring our trailer, our skilled folk, and our team," Cannon said. "We just need somewhere to land, such as a community centre, and we need the surgeries that are already pre-booked, and then we get busy."