Thunder Bay

Norval Morrisseau family, beneficiary make a deal

The family of the celebrated woodland painter and Gabor Vadas, the executor and sole beneficiary of his will, has agreed to an out-of-court deal.

Parties hopeful Morrisseau's work will become even more prominent within the artistic community

Norval Morrisseau was dubbed the Picasso of the North for his striking style.

There has been a settlement in a dispute over the estate of the late Norval Morrisseau.

The family of the celebrated woodland painter and Gabor Vadas, the executor and sole beneficiary of his will, have agreed to an out-of-court deal.

In June 2010, Morrisseau's children filed a lawsuit challenging the last will and testament of the acclaimed Ojibway artist.

Ted Charney, one of the lawyers representing the seven children, said "we expect that now that everyone is working together, his art will become even more prominent within the artistic community."

Reconcile past differences

"This settlement ensures that the children of Mr. Morrisseau are able to share in management of their father's artistic legacy while also recognizing the important role that the Vadas family played in Mr. Morrisseau's life," Charney stated in a press release issued Wednesday.

The press release also noted that Vadas, who was adopted by Mr. Morrisseau in accordance with the artist's shamanistic traditions, views the settlement as an opportunity for the parties to reconcile past differences and focus on increasing public understanding of Morrisseau's art.

Morrisseau was born on the Sand Point First Nation near Beardmore and was brought up at Sandy Lake, in northwestern Ontario. He was awarded the Order of Canada in 1978 and was acknowledged as Grand Shaman of the Ojibwa in 1986.

Morrisseau died in 2007.

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