NAN starts education program to stop sexual violence

Nishnawbe Aski Nation has launched a new education campaign to help recognize and prevent sexual violence.
The Nishnawbe Aski Nation's Draw-the-Line campaign is part of a national interactive campaign that aims to engage First Nations people and all Ontarians in a dialogue about sexual violence. The campaign challenges common myths about sexual violence and equips bystanders with information on how to intervene safely and effectively. Above is a screen capture from one of the campaign's educational videos. (Draw the Line)

Nishnawbe Aski Nation has launched a new education campaign to help recognize and prevent sexual violence.

It's part of a national interactive project aimed at engaging First Nations people and all Ontario residents in a dialogue about sexual violence.
"Sexual violence can and must be stopped," says Alvin Fiddler, Nishnawbe Aski Nation Deputy Grand Chief. Fiddler holds NAN's women's directorate portfolio. (Josh Lynn/CBC)

The campaign, called Draw-the-Line, was inaugurated at the NAN women's forum in Thunder Bay on Friday.

“Sexual violence, especially acts against women, is far too common and has devastating impacts on the health and well-being of not only the victims and their families but entire communities,” said Deputy Grand Chief Alvin Fiddler.

The campaign is not limited to First Nation communities, but NAN reports that aboriginal women are almost three times more likely than non-aboriginal women to report having been a victim of a violent crime. It also says sexual assault rates in First Nations communities are seven times higher than in the rest of Canada.

NAN Women's Council spokesperson Jackie Fletcher said Draw-the-Line will help people recognize sexual violence and empower them to make a difference. 

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