Thunder Bay

Record Lake Superior water levels prompt Lakehead Region Conservation Authority to issue flood watch

Record high water levels on Lake Superior have led the conservation authority in the Thunder Bay, Ont., area to issue a flood watch.

LRCA says advisory in effect for Lake Superior shoreline within its jurisdiction

The Lakehead Region Conservation Authority has issued a flood watch for the shoreline of Lake Superior within its jurisdiction, which runs from Hurkett, northeast of Thunder Bay, down to the Canada-U.S. border. (Matt Prokopchuk / CBC)

Record high water levels on Lake Superior have led the conservation authority in the Thunder Bay, Ont., area to issue a flood watch.

The watch, which the Lakehead Region Conservation Authority (LRCA) issues when there is the potential for flooding, extends along the Lake Superior shoreline within the LRCA's jurisdiction. The authority's coverage area spans from Hurkett, located about 85 kilometres northeast of Thunder Bay, to the Canada-U.S. border.

The lake level was two centimetres higher at the beginning of August than the previous record high for that time of year, the authority said in a written statement. The old record was set in 1950, officials noted, adding they expect levels to continue to rise throughout the month.

"The main concern during high lake levels is shoreline erosion and flooding of low-lying shorelines including beaches and wetlands along the shore," the statement from LRCA  said. "Residents in shoreline and low-lying areas along Lake Superior should anticipate further water level increases into the fall and a prolonged period of above average levels."

The record high water levels on Lake Superior come after the largest of the Great Lakes experienced some of the lowest levels in history in 2007.