Thunder Bay

Lac Seul First Nation celebrates the end of 17-year boil water advisory

Lac Seul First Nation has officially opened the doors on a new water treatment plant, ending a 17-year boil water advisory for the community of 350 people.

The Government of Canada partnered with Lac Seul First Nation in 2017 to build the new water treatment plant 

Indigenous Services Canada invested $4.7 million in support of the new water treatment plant, while the Small Communities Fund, Infrastructure Canada and Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure provided over $3.6 million for the project. (Penn-co Construction )

Lac Seul First Nation has officially opened the doors on a new water treatment plant, ending a 17-year boil water advisory for the community of 350 people.

The official grand opening of the new facility took place on Thursday, February 13 in the community of Kejick Bay. 

In a written statement, officials from Lac Seul First Nation said that the new facility is a good example of the government's effort to work in partnership with First Nations to access clean, safe drinking water.

The new facility comes after an existing water system no longer met provincial and federal drinking water regulations back in 2003. 

The Government of Canada partnered with Lac Seul First Nation in 2017 to build the new water treatment plant. 

Indigenous Services Canada invested $4.7 million in support of the project, while the Small Communities Fund, Infrastructure Canada and Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure provided over $3.6 million.

According the Penn-Co Construction, the Kejick Bay Water Treatment Plant is a 4200 square foot facility and is designed to have the potential for future expansion. 

The new plant was completed in 2019, and the long-term boil water advisory was lifted on January 7, 2020. 

Lac Seul First Nation is located 40 km northeast of Sioux Lookout, and is comprised of three communities, including Frenchman's Head, Whitefish Bay, and Kejick Bay.