Inventor from Rainy River First Nation seeks national distribution for Rip n' Go sheets

A member of the Rainy River First Nation hopes his company's patented special bed sheets will soon be available in stores across Canada.

Adrian Campbell and his wife invented Rip n' Go because they got tired of changing the crib sheets

Rip n' Go sheets were invented by Adrian Campbell and his wife because they got tired of changing the crib sheets every time their baby daughter's diaper leaked. (Rip N' Go/Supplied)

A member of the Rainy River First Nations hopes his company's patented special bed sheets will soon be available in stores across Canada.

Adrian Campbell says he and his wife invented Rip n' Go because they got tired of changing the crib sheets every time their baby daughter's diaper leaked.

Rip n' Go is a fitted sheet with a removable pad made of thicker, waterproof material. The removable pad is attached to the rest of the sheet with Velcro.

The pad can also be washed hundreds of times at high temperatures.

Users can change the pad in a crib or bed in about 20 seconds without changing the rest of the bedding, Campbell said.

Rip n' Go sheets are available for cribs, children's beds and adult beds.

National distribution

Campbell and his wife received funding from the Rainy River First Nations Trust to help get the product to market. The money paid for manufacturing, patents, a website and marketing materials.

The company now has a marketing team and sales force with plans to get the product onto shelves in baby and home health stores across Canada and eventually the U.S.

The company recently signed a deal with a nation-wide distributor, Campbell said.

He said the company also supplies units of Rip n' Go sheets to the Rainy River First Nations for children and the elderly.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.