Thunder Bay

Heat warning issued for northwestern Ontario heading into the weekend

A heat warning has been issued for northwestern Ontario on Friday as the 'dome of intense heat' hanging over western Canada moves into the region, according to Environment and Climate Change Canada.

'Dome of intense heat' arriving to northwestern Ontario from western Canada on Friday

Environment Canada has issued a heat warning for most of northwestern Ontario as the 'dome of intense heat' moves into the region on Friday. (Environment Canada)

A heat warning has been issued for northwestern Ontario on Friday as the 'dome of intense heat' hanging over western Canada moves into the region, according to Environment and Climate Change Canada.

Daytime highs will climb into the thirties, with humidex values expected to reach 40 C.

"It's really a three-day event — today, tomorrow and Sunday as well. But especially [Saturday], people will want to take precautions," said Peter Kimbell, a warning preparedness meteorologist with Environment Canada.

Kimbell said the heat wave will not be as extreme as what is being experienced out west, but temperatures will be high.

The warning extends from the Manitoba border east toward Greenstone and Hornepayne, and north almost to the coast of Hudson Bay. Areas around Nipigon and Marathon are not included because of the "cooling effect" on Lake Superior, added Kimbell.

The extreme heat is expected to last until Monday.

Thunder Bay asks residents to look out for each other

The warning prompted a heat warning weather alert from the City of Thunder Bay, as part of their COVID-19 Severe Weather Response Plan.

In a statement, the city asked residents to check in with vulnerable friends, neighbours and family to ensure they are not experiencing difficulties related to the extreme heat.

People at higher risk include infants and children, elderly, people with chronic conditions, outdoor workers, sports enthusiasts and people without access to proper shelter, clothing or food, the city said.

They recommended a number of precautions to prevent heat-related injuries, including:

  • Drink more water, more frequently.
  • Reduce exposure to direct sun and heat by finding shade or cool, indoor spaces.
  • Wear loose, light-coloured, breathable clothing and a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Avoid intense or moderately intense physical activity, especially during the hottest part of the day.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Take regular breaks in a cool place when working outdoors.

The city also reminded people that shelter services are available, including two 24-hour emergency shelters: Salvation Army at 545 Cumberland Street N. and Shelter House at 420 George Street.

Outreach workers have bus tickets available for those who may need to travel to shelters, and shelters will also relax service restrictions and continue to allow individuals to remain inside, according to the release.

The city also said if someone on the street needs outreach assistance due to the high temperatures, they should call SOS at 807-620-7678 or 911 for medical emergencies.

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