Thunder Bay

Geraldton Composite High School students head for Iceland

A dozen high school students from Geraldton are packing their bags for Iceland for a week-long journey to learn about the country's geography and culture.

Students had choice between Chicago, Toronto and Iceland

People look at a geyser in Geysir, Iceland. Students from Geraldton Composite High School will be in Iceland for a week. (Lucas Jackson/Reuters)

The students had a choice: Chicago, Toronto or a country some of them couldn't find on a map. 

The decision was unanimous, and a dozen high school students from Geraldton, Ont., are packing their bags for a week-long journey to Iceland.
Tim Griffin, left, and Andy McFarlane will lead the trip. (Supplied by Tim Griffith)

"They were frantically looking up Iceland and [the capital] Reykjavik and the things to do there," said Andy McFarlane, one of the two teachers leading the trip. "It was kind of neat as a geography teacher to be teaching them about Iceland through the opportunities they're going to get for that trip."

Teacher Tim Griffin said the country has incredible teaching opportunities because of its active geology and rich cultural history.

"Somebody once said, 'You never let school get in the way of a good education', and we think we're combining both here," he said.

Wide-ranging tour

Griffin said the trip will include a visit to an Icelandic school, where his students will do a presentation on northwestern Ontario. They'll also visit hot springs, a geothermal spa and a national park. They may also do some whale-watching and a cave tour. 
The Skogarfoss waterfall in Iceland. Students will learn about the country's geography and culture. (Lucas Jackson/Reuters)

For hockey players in the group, they've also organized some games against local players.

Griffin said the trip will combine real-world learning that they can connect to the classroom and create memories that will last a lifetime.

The students leave Friday. 
 


 

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