Thunder Bay

Emerald ash borer confirmed in Thunder Bay: city

Officials with the City of Thunder Bay say the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has confirmed the presence of the invasive emerald ash borer in the city.

Invasive insects found in trees 'within a small radius' near intersection of 4th Ave. and Memorial Ave.

Thunder Bay city officials say the emerald ash borer has been confirmed in the city. (David Cappaert/Michigan State University)

Officials with the City of Thunder Bay say the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has confirmed the presence of the invasive emerald ash borer in the city.

The insect has been rapidly spreading across North America and had previously been detected as close as Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. and Duluth, Minn.

"Since ash trees make up approximately 25 per cent of the city's street trees, we intend to explore as many options as possible to mitigate [the emerald ash borer's] impacts and slow its movement," city forester Shelley Vescio was quoted as saying in a news release put out by the city late Thursday afternoon.

The release added that the insect was originally found last week in trees "within a small radius" of the intersection of Memorial Avenue and 4th Avenue.

City staff are collaborating with the provincial Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, as well as the food inspection agency to survey surrounding areas to see if the ash borer has spread any further, the release said. Traps will also be installed around the site.

"When EAB arrives here all of those ash trees will be killed and will require immediate removal to reduce potential hazards," Vescio was quoted as saying in another release in June.

A response plan is slated to be presented to city council at its next meeting on July 18. Public information sessions are scheduled for July 19 and 20.

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