Thunder Bay

Defibrillator, quick response, credited for saving man's life at Canada Games Complex

The presence of a public defibrillator and the quick actions taken by staff at the Canada Games Complex and Thunder Bay paramedics are being credited with saving a man's life.

Superior North EMS says 64 year-old collapsed while playing squash Tuesday

Staff at the Canada Games Complex are being credited with saving a man's life after responding quickly to a medical emergency on Tuesday. (Matt Prokopchuk / CBC)

The presence of a public defibrillator and the quick actions taken by staff at the Canada Games Complex and Thunder Bay paramedics are being credited with saving a man's life.

In a written release issued Friday, officials with Superior North EMS said that on Tuesday, a 64 year-old man collapsed while playing squash at the Canada Games Complex around 9:00 a.m.

A public defibrillator was used until the 64 year-old, who was playing squash when he collapsed, regained a pulse. (Celeste Mannila)

Staff reportedly called 911, while a complex supervisor and two lifeguards attended to the man, who was not breathing and was without a pulse, according to emergency officials.

They performed CPR and used a defibrillator until the man regained a pulse and paramedics arrived, who subsequently took over, according to Friday's statement.

The man was taken to the Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre, where he is reportedly still receiving treatment.

"The next time you enter a public facility ... I encourage you to find the location of the public access defibrillator and if you have not done so yet, take a CPR course," Superior North EMS Deputy Chief Andrew Dillon was quoted as saying. 

"It's a skill I hope you will never have to use, but if needed, you can save a life."

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