Thunder Bay

Thunder Bay resident develops interactive map plotting cyclist, pedestrian collisions with vehicles

A Thunder Bay man has set up a website that shows the location of each collision involving a pedestrian or cyclist and a vehicle over the past five years.

Andrew Brigham said he used police data to show online where each crash happened since 2014

Thunder Bay resident Andrew Brigham has created an interactive map that shows the location of each reported collision between a pedestrian or cyclist and a vehicle. (https://andrewbrigham.ca/)

A Thunder Bay man has set up a website that shows the location of each reported collision involving a pedestrian or cyclist and a vehicle over the past five years.

Andrew Brigham is behind the project, which uses data he said he got from Thunder Bay police through freedom of information requests. Each collision is represented by an icon on a map of Thunder Bay; users click on the icon to display more information like when it occurred, how police classified it (was it fatal or not) and who police determined had the right of way.

He said there have been close to 100 such incidents each year since 2014.

"My immediate family are all cyclists, pedestrians and they use transit quite a bit," Brigham said. "The safety of my family is a huge concern and anyone who walks or bikes as much as my family members has had some fairly close calls."

Brigham said he wanted to draw attention to an issue that he said often doesn't get enough.

"Last year, I was nearly struck crossing a street at Madeline and River, the driver simply didn't see me as I was crossing."

The sheer number of incidents was surprising, Brigham said.

"I don't think you get to hear about every single incident that occurs in Thunder Bay ... and nor do I think that the public really want to hear about every single incident," he said. "But until you actually see every single reported incident, it isn't impactful and then when you see them all, it really hits home."

Andrew Brigham's map also breaks down the data by ward and provides some analysis. (https://andrewbrigham.ca/)

Brigham has also broken down all his data by city ward and has provided some analysis as well as opportunities for feedback and ideas to improve safety conditions. Generally, he said, most collisions happen at intersections.

He said he wants to add more information to the site, including everything from possible solutions, educational materials and research to expressive art, seeing it as an opportunity to build a wide-ranging resource on the issue.

"I really want it to be a tool for advocacy and support," he said, adding that he hopes people accessing the data will inspire discussions.

"I'm not a big fan of just presenting a problem," Brigham said, adding that he intends to add more updated data in 2020.