Canada

Terror suspect Jaballah to be released

Mahmoud Jaballah will be the latest security certificate detainee who will be released on bail with strict conditions attached, a federal judge ruled Tuesday.

Mahmoud Jaballah will be the latest security certificate detainee to be released on bail with strict conditions attached, a federal judge ruled Tuesday.

Justice Carolyn Layden-Stevenson said at a bail hearing that theEgyptian-born Jaballahwill be released from a Kingston prison and placed under house arrest, but has not yet written her decision or the specific conditions attached.

The ruling means Jaballah, 44,who isaccused by the Canadian government of being a threat to national security, could be free as early as March 22, when Layden-Stevenson said she hoped to give written reasons for her decisionat a hearing in Ottawa.

Jaballah has been held on a security certificate for six years under suspicion of having ties to a terrorist organization called al-Jihad in Egypt. He was denied asylum, a decision upheld by a Federal Court earlier last year.

The Canadian government is trying to deport him back to Egypt, where Jaballah says he will be tortured and killed.

In February, the Supreme Court struck down the security certificate system used to hold the suspects. In a unanimous 9-0 decision, the court ruled that the certificates violate the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Home to be monitored

Jaballah's son Ahmedtold reporters Tuesday thatCanada Border Services is expected to equip the family's home with devices to monitor him.

"For us right now, we want him home regardless of what it takes," his son said. "If these conditions mean having him home, then we're willing to comply with them."

Jaballah has never been charged with any crime.

Once he is released, only two men will remain behind bars as a result of security certificates: Mohammad Mahjoub and Hassan Almrei.

Mahjoub was ordered released Feb. 15 under similarly strict conditions, but has not yetbeen freed from detention.

Two others — Mohamed Harkatand Adil Charkaoui — have already been released under strict conditions.

With files from the Canadian Press

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