Sudbury·Audio

New turtle crossing signs are going up on Southview Drive in Sudbury

A local environmental group will be unveiling two new turtle crossing signs on a Sudbury street today.

Declining turtle population largely due to motor vehicle collisions, researcher says

Two new signs will be unveiled today along Southview Drive in Sudbury. The turtle crossing signs were erected between Robinson Street and Kelly Lake Road by the Junction Creek Stewardship Committee. (Angela Gemmill/CBC)
There are new signs along Southview Drive warning drivers about nearby wildlife. They're for a turtle crossing. Sarah Woods, Research Manager and Co-ordinator for Junction Creek Stewardship Committee, explained why this is such a hot spot for turtles. 4:55

A local environmental group will be unveiling two new turtle crossing signs on a Sudbury street today.

The Junction Creek Stewardship Committee purchased the signs that will be posted along Southview Drive, between Robinson Street and Kelly Lake Road.

The research manager and co-ordinator with the group told CBC News she believes the signs will help reduce the number of turtles struck and killed by vehicles.

"We have a lot of confidence in the sense of conservation in Sudbury. Sudburians in general really do care about wildlife," Sarah Woods said.

"The sign is there just to remind people to slow down, to take an extra look for potential things on the road, to warn them to avoid potential turtles."

Woods said female turtles cross from nearby Lily Creek to lay their eggs in the soil along the side of the road.

The turtle population is declining and that's mostly due to motor vehicle collisions, a researcher says. (Supplied/Sean Boyle)

Southview: a hot spot

She noted the turtle population is declining and road collisions are in large part to blame.

The section along Southview Road is a hot spot.

"Females like to lay their eggs in well-drained soil that have a lot of sun, so what better place to lay them than beside a road? The bridge between Robinson and Kelly Lake goes over, it happens to be Lily Creek, in this case," Woods said.

"Turtles travel from the lakes up the creek to the side of the road to lay their eggs."

The signs have been posted in each direction, 100-metres from the bridge to warn motorists to slow down.

There are three species of turtles around Greater Sudbury: snapping turtle, painted turtle (listed as a species at risk) and the blandings turtle (a threatened species).

The closest area for turtle crossing signs are near Fairbank Lake, but none in the core of the city.

A local environmental group will be unveiling two new turtle crossing signs — similar to this one — on a Sudbury street today. (Yvon Theriault/Radio-Canada)

with files from Angela Gemmill

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