Sudbury·Audio

Syrian refugee family waits on grandfather's arrival to Sudbury

A family of Syrian refugees is getting settled in Sudbury this week — but they are still waiting for one more family member to arrive before they can call the Nickel City home.

Children started school on Monday morning

The Qarquoz family arrived on New Year's Eve to dozens of well wishers waving Canadian flags at the Sudbury Airport. (Olivia Stefanovich/CBC)
They came on New Year's Eve. The new year represents a new life for the Qarquoz family, Syrian refugees now calling Sudbury home. Joanne Ross told us how the family is doing. She's the chair of the St. Andrew's United Church refugee assistance program. 9:35

A family of Syrian refugees is getting settled in Sudbury this week — but they are still waiting for one more family member to arrive before they can call the Nickel City home.

When the Qarqouz family arrived at the Sudbury airport New Year's Eve, a mother, father and three children got off the plane.

Missing was the grandfather, who was held back because of passport issues. He is currently waiting at a refugee camp in Lebanon, where they have been staying for the last few years.

Joanne Ross, who is with the St. Andrew's United Church refugee assistance committee, said the elder family member could arrive at any time.

"We have to just be very flexible and fluid and respond when they send the email that says they're on their way."

The Qarqouz family is the first of several Syrian refugees slated to arrive in the city.

Ross said the family was chosen because the dad is a baker, and his skills will fit well in the community.

The entire family will spend the new year getting English tutoring. The three boys — who are between the ages of nine and 12 — started classes at a public elementary school on Monday morning.

It's been more than four months since two refugee families from Syria arrived in Sudbury. (CBC)

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