Sudbury

Sudbury, Ont. couple heading to U.S. for Women's March detained, questioned at border

A Sudbury, Ont. couple say they were detained, questioned, and searched by United States border services for more than an hour, after they told guards about plans to participate in the Women's March on Washington.

'The impression that we got was they were looking for a reason to not allow us entry,' Amber Gazdic says

Amber Gazdic and her husband Chris Bolestridge said they were questioned for over an hour at the U.S. border in Niagara Falls before they were eventually allowed entry. "We were told that if we got in any trouble they would personally see to it that we would never be allowed entry to the US again," Gazdic said. (Amber Gazdic)

A Sudbury, Ont. couple say they were detained, questioned, and searched by United States border services for more than an hour, after they told guards about plans to participate in the Women's March on Washington.

Amber Gazdic told CBC News that she and her husband were trying to cross the U.S. border in Niagara Falls on Thursday when they were promptly pulled aside.

"We ... were told essentially that, as Canadians, we had no right to go and participate in this march," she said.

"[They said] it's none of our business, and Canada has its own problems we should address. The impression that we got was that they were looking for a reason to not allow entry."

We were told that if we got in any trouble they would personally see to it that we would never be allowed entry to the U.S. again.- Amber  Gazdic , Sudbury, Ont. woman headed to Women's March on Washington

Gazdic said border security spent over an hour questioning the couple and searching their car before they reluctantly granted them entry.

"We were told that if we got in any trouble they would personally see to it that we would never be allowed entry to the U.S. again."

Other Canadians being turned away

Gazdic isn't the only Canadian to encounter issues while trying to cross the border to get to Washington.

On Thursday, a group of Montrealers were denied access to the United States when they tried to cross the St. Bernard de Lacolle, Que., border to attend Donald Trump's inauguration and the Women's March.

One of the Montrealers who was turned away is a dual U.S. citizen.

As for Gazdic, she said she felt compelled to march in Washington as a Canadian.

"We have friends and family across the border who are in real danger of losing their health insurance as well as losing some of their important rights," she said.

"I think it's important that my daughters know if there is something they believe in that they have to make an effort to represent that."

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