Sudbury·Video

Sudbury video showcases a day in the life of Nickel City residents

A number of videos promoting Sudbury have surfaced — and they're getting a lot of buzz online.

A number of videos promoting Sudbury have surfaced — and they're getting a lot of buzz online. 

One of the most recent is called "Portrait of Downtown Sudbury," a video commissioned by the organization Downtown Sudbury to showcase what life is like in the community.

The short film follows the life in the day of four Sudbury resident.

"We forget sometimes what we have here," said Maureen Luoma, executive director of Downtown Sudbury.

"Yes, there are challenges and, yes, there are obstacles that we need to continue to work on. But there's a really lot of good things. And I think that that's reminding us of what we have here and it's just helping to spread that word."

The point of the short film isn't just to boost tourism, she continued, but to remind people who live in Sudbury of what they have.
The owner of Cafe Petit Gateau, Yoshi Kugori, participated in a short documentary film about life in Sudbury. The point of the short film is to boost tourism and remind people who live in Sudbury of what they have, a business official says. (You Tube)

"There are obstacles that we need to continue to work on. But there's a really lot of good things."

This is the second film that cinematographer Mathieu Séguin has done about Sudbury.

"There's a purpose to every image," he said. "I'm always revealing new information. There's a feeling to it."

Seguin said he hopes his work connects with viewers so it can change attitudes about the city.​

A new video is trying to prove that downtown Sudbury is different from what you might think. The video is called "Portrait of Sudbury Downtown" and is the work of cinematographer Mathieu Seguin. Mathieu joined us in studio to tell us more. 4:32

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