Sudbury

Sudbury's Tom Davies Square will look like an episode of Dragon's Den today

Sixteen people want their Sudbury dreams to become a reality — and they're pitching big city projects today at Tom Davies Square with the hope of getting some funding.
Greater Sudbury Mayor Brian Bigger says he's "in favour of any ideas that people bring forward." (Yvon Theriault/Radio-Canada)

Sixteen people want their Sudbury dreams to become a reality — and they're pitching big city projects today at Tom Davies Square with the hope of getting some funding.

The ideas range from a multi-purpose convention and performing arts centre, to a light rail public transit system.

Mayor Brian Bigger said he hopes the event encourages partnerships that will improve the community .
Demetra Christakos is the director of the Art Gallery of Sudbury. (Twitter)
Travis Morgan has an idea for a light rail public transit system that he will present to Sudbury city council. He wants the city to use existing rail lines to connect to outlying areas. (Olivia Stefanovich/CBC)

"We are trying to move the city forward, and so this just is an open and transparent venue for public input," he said.

The Greater Sudbury Development Corporation will evaluate the pitches, and then staff will make recommendations to council at a later date, Bigger noted.

"I'm in favour of any ideas that people bring forward."

Art Gallery of Sudbury director Demetra Christakos will be pitching a new spacious downtown home for the cultural institution.

"We have this vision and we're really starting from, as we say, from the ground up."

Christakos's vision will compete against Travis Morgan's idea for a light rail public transit system. He wants the city to use existing rail lines to connect to outlying areas.

"What I want people to do is think of the bigger picture because what we have right now is costing the city a fortune. It's destroying the roads. And we can't afford to build new roads. What I'm proposing would save us money in the long run," he said.

Presenters receive 20 minutes each to persuade their audience.

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