Sudbury

Fire crews continue to monitor northeast fire situation

Despite a quiet forest fire season in northeastern Ontario, forest rangers are still out in the bush keeping an eye on the situation.
Fire crews from Ontario assisted in several areas this past fire season, including British Columbia. (Canadian Press)

Despite a quiet forest fire season in northeastern Ontario, forest rangers are still out in the bush keeping an eye on the situation.

The season isn't officially over until Oct. 31.

Fire information officer Isabelle Chenard says the public should keep that in mind when outdoors.

"The fall in Ontario includes hunting season we all know and we want to make sure that the public is aware of the presence of fire rangers in our forest well until the end of October," she said.

"So please make sure that if you are traveling on remote roads and taking part in hunting activities that you keep an eye out for our staff."

Currently, there are no active forest fires burning in northeastern Ontario.

Sending help

Chenard says due to the quiet forest fire season in Ontario, this province was able to send staff and resources to other areas to help.

In total, 1,040 aviation, forest fire and emergency services staff members were sent from Ontario to assist.

Most were sent to British Columbia, however Chenard says equipment and staff were also sent to Manitoba, Alberta and Montana as well.

She says the coordination of resources is done by a centre in Manitoba.

"We have established agreements between our country's provinces that allow for movement of staff interprovincially when the need arises," she said.

"So how it works basically is that a province that's seeing increased fire activity like BC this year can place requests … for either equipment to fight fire at the ground level, for aircraft assistance … or for boots on the ground."

From there, requests are sent out across the country for help, she says.

"When our staff goes out province, Ontario pays its own staff that's deployed and then the province receives a fixed cost per person, per day from the province that requested the resource," she said.

Chenard says some staff members were sent to other locations more than once to assist.