Sudbury·Morning North

Sudbury Everest College students angered by closure

Students who attended the Sudbury campus of Everest College are wondering what their future holds after finding the doors to their school suddenly closed on Thursday.

'All we know is that our lives are going down the drain right now'

Josh Brohart was also studying to be a counsellor at Everest College in Sudbury. He wonders if he will be able to do a placement to finish his program. (Kate Rutherford/CBC)
Everest College had its license suspended because of financial instability. The association that represents private career colleges in Ontario says there are options for former students of the college. Paul Kitchin of the association shared some details. 4:57
Students who attended the Sudbury campus of Everest College are wondering what their future holds after finding the doors to their school suddenly closed on Thursday.

Ontario's Ministry of Colleges and Training suspended Everest College Canada's licence because it feels the school isn't financially stable. 

Roberta O'Brien was studying to be a counsellor in addictions and mental health at Everest College in Sudbury. She said there was little information on why the province pulled the plug.

"All we know is that our lives are going down the drain right now because of some government bullshit," O'Brien said.

Students were given paperwork indicating they might be eligible for a tuition refund, but there are an estimated 2,600 students at the 14 Everest College locations in Ontario and the province said that fund is capped at $3 million.

Tuition varies according to program but one student said she was $30,000 in debt after two years.

Joy Bourque of Sudbury was studying to be a personal support worker.

"Now I gotta go home and tell my kids, tell my Mom, tell my husband, guess what? I no longer have school. And some of us going to be PSWs, now there's all those people out there who might need us for work, and we're not there."

Lack of information

A ministry official was sent to Sudbury to speak with students, but Josh Brohart, who was studying to be counsellor, said that ministry official couldn't answer any of the students' questions.

"You would think that somebody who was going to be representing and relaying this information to our campus would have been highly educated," he said.

Brohart said he only has his placement to do and might be able to finish his program. But some students said there aren't any comparable programs offered in the city.

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