Sudbury·Audio

Sudbury Everest College student still in limbo

The province has been exploring options for students left in a lurch by the sudden closure of Everest College campuses, but solutions have not been found for everyone.

'I just feel like I'm getting the runaround. I'm not getting treated with any form of respect.'

Leena Poxleitner of Sudbury decided to take a tuition refund after plans to offer the massage therapy courses she needed locally didn't materialize. (Megan Thomas/CBC)
A former Everest College student says more than ten weeks after the career college closed they still don't know how they'll finish their education. Leena Poxleitner spoke to us about how the Ministry of Training and Colleges isn't helping much. 8:17

The province has been exploring options for students left in a lurch by the sudden closure of Everest College campuses, but solutions have not been found for everyone.

In February, all 14 locations of Everest College in Ontario closed after the province pulled its license to operate. The company declared bankruptcy the next day. 

The Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities offered to help the 2,400 displaced students across the province complete their education or get a tuition refund. 

But Leena Poxleitner, a massage therapy student in Sudbury, said the ministry still hasn't found a way for her to complete her training.

Poxleitner said she was offered the option of completing her courses at College Boreal, Sudbury's French college, but she doesn't speak French.

"I just feel like I'm getting the runaround. I'm not getting treated with any form of respect, it's so discouraging," she said.

"The ministry came in and looked like it saved the day, and I have 10 weeks of no school and no employment as of right now. You can't go to an employer saying, I don't know when I'm going back [to school]."

Poxleitner said she has already spent more than $20,000 on tuition,

She said if the situation does not get sorted out soon she will miss the next opportunity to write the provincial exams for her certification, leaving her unable to seek employment in her field for another year.

"I have a mortgage. I have two small children," she said. "I was under the impression I was going to be back to school within two months." 

In an email, the ministry said it's been sending out option packages since March 11 and will continue to do so as options for students become available.

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