Sudbury·Audio

Sudbury police increase security at events after Paris bombing

Sudbury police say they've stepped up security at public events following the recent terrorism attacks in France.
Sudbury Police Chief Paul Pederson says increases in the service's 2016 budget are to pay for salary increases for police and staff. (Yvon Theriault/Radio-Canada)
Attacks like the one in Paris have lead to a greater police presence at city events in Sudbury. You might now see security at events like the Santa Clause parade. Police chief Paul Pederson spoke about the matter with the CBC's Marina von Stackelberg. 2:36

Sudbury police say they've stepped up security at public events following the recent terrorism attacks in France.

Sudbury police chief Paul Pederson says the landscape of security at public gatherings has changed dramatically in the last few years.

He says even smaller gatherings now require a police presence that wasn't needed in the past.

"Every single event. You hate to say it, but [with the] Santa Claus parade coming up, where we used to just direct traffic and control crowds. We're also providing security for that too."

Pederson said city marathons or vigils now also require security. Sudbury police have both a visible and undercover presence at public events.

"It wasn't that long ago where on a Remembrance Day, officers dressed in No. 1 uniforms marching through the streets wouldn't have had any concerns about their safety. But now we have to protect those marching and those watching," Pederson said.

"[Even] relatively small events like the vigil held in Memorial park for France on the weekend. Every one of them requires a security presence that in the past didn't."

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