Sudbury·Audio

Canadian snowbirds reflect on getting their COVID-19 vaccinations in the U.S.

A Nipissing Township couple who spend their winters in Arizona say they don't feel any guilt about getting their COVID-19 vaccinations in the U.S.

'It's important that we get vaccinated for others, so that we don't spread it to Americans'

Northern Ontario residents Will and Mona Presley, who are in their 60s, just received their first dose of the Pfizer vaccine in Arizona, where they spend their winters. (Victoria Jones/The Associated Press)

A Nipissing Township couple who spend their winters in Arizona say they don't feel any guilt about getting their COVID-19 vaccinations in the U.S.

Will and Mona Presley have already had their first shot and are scheduled for their second. 

"There is no restriction on citizenship or residency down here. We were treated like anybody else as far as residency," Will Presley told Morning North host Markus Schwabe.

"Of course, there are restrictions down here. They're loosening up by the week. But initially it was our friends who are over 75, got their vaccines, mostly shots in January, and are mostly completed now."

The couple are on the cusp of turning 65, but have health conditions that moved them along the queue a little more quickly.

Presley said they proactively tried to find a place to get vaccinated. When they finally got an appointment, they presented their Canadian identification and easily rolled through the process.

"[There was] not a second glance. [They said] 'you're close enough [to 65] and you've got a condition. Okay, here's your shot.'"

The couple will be back for their second dose of the Pfizer vaccine in the next couple of weeks.

Knowing that Canadians in the same age bracket are still waiting for their vaccines does not cause feelings of guilt, Presley says.

"Taking the shot didn't take anything away from them. I know everybody in the world is unhappy about the speed that it's taking to get their shot, [so] it doesn't matter what country, including this one. It's just a matter of we're in the United States, which is the richest, most powerful country in the world with their own facilities," he said.

"And they have the ability to get their people done before anybody else. And it's important that we get vaccinated for others, so that we don't spread it to Americans. So there's no guilt at all."

Tap the player to hear the whole interview.

Most of us still have to wait for the COVID vaccine. But a couple from Nipissing Township have already had their first shot and are scheduled for their second. Will Presley and his wife got vaccinated in Arizona, where they're spending the winter as snowbirds. 6:13

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