Sudbury

Let's Remember Adam Stop for School Bus campaign releases safety reminder videos

Nineteen years after his younger brother Adam was killed, Pierre Ranger still continues to promote a message about school bus safety.

5-year old Adam Ranger died February 11, 2000 near Mattawa after vehicle tried to pass his school bus

One of the 'Let's Remember Adam' billboards used to remind drivers to stop for the flashing lights of a stopped school bus. (Let's Remember Adam Stop for the School Bus Facebook)

Nineteen years after his younger brother was killed, Pierre Ranger still continues to promote a message about school bus safety.

Five-year old Adam Ranger was killed February 11, 2000 while getting off his school bus in Mattawa, Ont.

Since then the Ranger family has worked to get drivers to stop for the flashing lights of the school bus.

This year, since mid January, the Let's Remember Adam campaign has released several messaging videos.

Pierre Ranger says they decided to create videos because they're easy to share on social media. 

"Most of the videos are of myself and my mother speaking about Adam and the campaign," he said.

"I think the message really gets driven home when you hear it from our voices."

Ranger says they decided to release videos because they're easy to share on social media, and that is yet another way to spread the safety message.

"Social media is an amazing thing when used properly. The videos really send a message home."

He adds that the main factor behind doing the videos was to continue to remind drivers that it's imperative that they stop for school buses.

"The school bus might stop and you might be thinking 'I got to wait behind this bus, that's going to take my personal time. I don't have time to wait.'"

"That's a child's life out there. If you run that stop-arm and hit a child your life is never going to be the same again and neither is that family or that community's," Ranger said.

The Let's Remember Adam: Stop for the School Bus campaign is also pushing to add technology on school buses, like stop arm cameras that would record details of any vehicle that attempts to pass.

Ranger says even though it's been 19 years he'll never get over his brother's death, but pushing the safety message helps him.

"We don't want any other family to have to go through what we go through and continue to go through, so that's the whole purpose behind the Let's Remember Adam campaign."

The Let's Remember Adam campaign has come up with a new way to get bus safety on people's minds. It involves a series of videos. 5-year-old Adam Ranger was killed when a vehicle attempted to pass a school bus and struck him 19 years ago. We spoke about the new videos with Adam's older brother, Pierre Ranger. 8:08

With files from Angela Gemmill

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.