Ontario's emergency health response to continue in Attawapiskat after 30 day commitment

Ontario's Minister of Health confirmed on Monday that an emergency medical assistance team will continue working in Attawapiskat, Ont., after its initial 30-day commitment, to help with the ongoing suicide crisis in the remote James Bay community.

Province still working on transition from emergency response to long-term plan to address suicide attempts

Attawapiskat Chief Bruce Shisheesh, left, invited provincial ministers and the chief of the Assembly of First Nations Perry Bellegarde to Attawapiskat last month. After the meeting with the chief, Health Minister Eric Hoskins, right, announced up to $2 million to fund four mental health workers. (CBC)

Ontario's Minister of Health confirmed on Monday that an emergency medical assistance team will continue working in Attawapiskat, Ont., after its initial 30-day commitment, to help with the ongoing suicide crisis in the remote James Bay community.

In a statement, Eric Hoskins said psychosocial support will increase.

"We will continue to work closely with the community and Indigenous leadership as we transition from emergency response to a long-term plan with the health-care supports and resources necessary to support the community as they overcome this crisis and restore hope to the youth of Attawapiskat," wrote Hoskins. 

The provincial government deployed an emergency medical assistance team and committed $2 million towards Attawapiskat last month for a period of 30 days. 

Hoskins said he assured Attawapiskat Chief Bruce Shisheesh of the province's ongoing commitment to the community on Monday afternoon. 

Hoskins said emergency workers will be working with the Weeneebayko Area Health Authority staff to integrate the clinical care team and ensure they have the resources they need to care for the community.