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Anishinabek Nation's new interactive online resource teaches students about treaties, rights

The Anishinabek Nation in northern Ontario has launched a new online program to help students learn more about First Nations history, treaties and Aboriginal rights.

'It covers everything from probably 1764 up until today,' Ontario First Nation's grand chief says

A screen grab of part of the online educational resource launched by Anishinabek Nation in northern Ontario, to help teach students about treaties, rights and history. (Anishinabek.ca)

The Anishinabek Nation in northern Ontario has launched a new online program to help students learn more about First Nations history, treaties and Aboriginal rights.

The interactive program, which includes videos from elders, is a resource for educators to reach both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students. 

Anishinabek Nation Grand Chief Reginald Niganobe says the new resource is child friendly and easy to use. (anishinabeknews.ca)

The new tool is "very kid friendly, very easy to follow," including in helping explain treaties," said Grand Chief Reg Niganobe.

"It covers everything from probably 1764 up until today."

Niganobe said that as students learn more, the program could foster more conversation at home about treaties.

"Into the future, especially as these young children grow up to be leaders, they need to understand that treaty relationship and the relationship that First Nations have with non-Indigenous people."

The reality is, generations of students have not been taught about treaties​​​​​​.​- Kelly Crawford, treaty educator, M'Chigeeng First Nation

"Feedback from teachers is that it's an excellent resource," Niganobe said, adding the First Nation is willing to provide more resources if needed.

"We also have extensive reference material at the Anishinabek Nation which they can contact.

"They can reach out to some of the people in the video itself who talk about treaties," Niganobe said.

Kelly Crawford, a treaty educator from M'Chigeeng First Nation, an Ojibway First Nation in the Manitoulin district, is among those who speak on the video.

"The reality is, generations of students have not been taught about treaties," she says.

"It is vitally important for us to understand that these agreements have allowed for peaceful settlement on these lands. Every person should know what traditional territory and what treaty area they live on."

The program is available on the website of the Anishinabek Nation, which says it's committed to supporting a clear and responsible understanding of the treaty relationship.

 

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