Sudbury

Northern Ontario Party gearing up for 2018 election, proposes 'northern' MNRF

If the Northern Ontario Party has its way, there would be a Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry devoted to the north.

Party leader Trevor Holliday says past legislation goes against 'what northerners know is happening'

Trevor Holliday, leader of the Northern Ontario Party, thinks there should be a stand-alone Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry for the north. (Northern Ontario Party)

If the Northern Ontario Party has its way, there will be a Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry devoted to the north.

At a Nipissing riding association meeting Monday night, party leader Trevor Holliday outlined his plans for a parallel ministry.

"If the MNR is created for northern Ontario, there could be two separate entities," Holliday said. "Or have the one, that's all based and run out of northern Ontario, where the natural resources are."

But the party's overall goal is still to separate the north of the province from bigger cities down south, like Toronto. And more details of their platform will be made public soon, Holliday said.

The party's predecessor, the Northern Ontario Heritage Party, was formed in 1977,  but has never managed to secure any seats in the provincial legislature.
Trevor Holliday, leader of the Northern Ontario Party, says its important for northerners to make decisions for northern Ontario, especially regarding issues such as the spring bear hunt. (CBC file photo)

As for the MNRF, Holliday said his party would ensure the ministry would be based in the region and operated by people from the north.

"The current government, anytime they make a decision, it's usually against what northerners know is happening," Holliday said.

He cited legislation around the spring bear hunt, and confusion over Ontario's moose population.

"They blame wolves, and they keep jumping to conclusions on what they think is causing problems," Holliday said. "Instead of actually asking the people who've lived in the areas."

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