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North Bay's Vic Fedeli to run for Ontario PC party leadership

Former North Bay mayor Vic Fedeli is jumping into the race to become the next leader of Ontario's Progressive Conservatives, and says he wants to see a kinder, gentler party.
Nipissing MPP Vic Fedeli says the southern terminal fees are a clear example of why transit systems in the north and south should be combined. (The Canadian Press/Frank Gunn)
The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party is looking to rebound with a new leader after losing the provincial election last year. 4:51

Former North Bay mayor Vic Fedeli is jumping into the race to become the next leader of Ontario's Progressive Conservatives, and says he wants to see a kinder, gentler party.

Fedeli told supporters at a downtown Toronto office tower where he launched his campaign that he is tired of apologizing for the PC party and the election campaigns it runs.

But he stopped short of calling his party's election campaign promise to cut 100,000 public sector jobs a mistake, saying only that the Tories have got to stop giving people reasons to vote against them.

Fedeli said he wants to reach out to many groups to find new Conservative candidates, including unions, a line that drew scant applause from his Bay Street audience.

He is the third official candidate to replace Tim Hudak as PC leader, joining caucus colleagues Monte McNaughton and Christine Elliott in the race.

Nepean-Carleton MPP Lisa MacLeod is openly preparing a leadership bid of her own, while federal Conservative MP Patrick Brown is scheduled to join the Ontario race Sunday at an event in his Barrie riding.

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