Sudbury

Mining rope testing machine to be replaced in Sudbury, province says

A new machine to test wire ropes that will lift ore and other materials in mines is coming to Sudbury.

Almost $2.6M being spent to replace outdated equipment

Ontario's Minister of Labour Laurie Scott checks out rope testing equipment in Sudbury with Harsimran Kalsi, the provincial coordinator of the mining program with the Ministry of Labour. The province is spending almost $2.6 million to replace the machine. (Casey Stranges/CBC)

A new machine to test wire ropes that will lift ore and other materials in mines is coming to Sudbury.

On Tuesday, Ontario's Minister of Labour Laurie Scott, made the announcement in Sudbury. The province is spending almost $2.6 million for the new machine.

"Mines rely on reliable ropes to not only bring the workers up and down through the underground mines but also the ore," she said.

"We want to make sure those ropes are reliable. They're tested every six months to make sure the safety is there."

Mine operators are required by law to have rope samples tested. Scott says the machine not only tests ropes from Ontario mines, but ropes from across Canada and the world.

The province says the current machine was purchased in 1991 and has been breaking down. It says the old machine has been taken out of service six times in the past few years as a result.

"The new machine will be able to test both wire ropes as well as synthetic ropes, which are likely to be used in the future," the province stated in a release.

"Mine operators are required by law to submit rope samples to the lab for testing."

It will be located at the Materials Testing Laboratory, operated by the Ministry of Labour in Sudbury and is expected to be up and running in the spring of 2020.

With files from Casey Stranges

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