Sudbury·Audio

Pandemic presents new challenges for addiction treatment program in Sudbury

The head of an addiction treatment centre in Sudbury says trying to help clients over the past three months was extremely challenging.

Organization lead worries about recovery relapses — and fears some people may be falling through the cracks

One of the meeting rooms at Monarch Recovery Services for women in Sudbury. During the pandemic, people in recovery from addictions are having to rely on phone calls and texts to get support. (Jan Lakes CBC)

The head of an addiction treatment centre in Sudbury says trying to help clients over the past three months was extremely challenging.

Monarch Recovery Services offers a live-in and day program for those dealing with drug and alcohol addiction. When the COVID-19 pandemic hit in mid March, they had to alter the day program treatment, CEO Roxane Zuck said.

Counselling and check-ins had to be done through phone calls or texts.

Monarch was able to continue its live-in treatment program, but those clients have found it tough due to limited contact with family and outside peers.

"I think the isolation was hard on a lot of them, and just being away from their peer group and their supports, like AA [Alcoholics Anonymous] and NA [Narcotics Anonymous]," Zuck said.

"I think it was hard on a lot of people to not have those connections."

Zuck said she worries the challenges and strain may have caused some clients to relapse in their recovery — and  fears some people may be falling through the cracks.

Monarch Recovery Services is expected to be back to full capacity soon.

To hear more about how they are reaching out to help those in recovery, listen to Roxane Zuck's interview with the CBC's Jessica Pope.

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