Sudbury

Kitten burned in fire recovering at Walden Animal hospital

The little kitten named Dobby is getting round the clock treatment at the Walden Animal hospital in Sudbury, Ont., after he was found injured following a garage fire.

According to the hospital, the kitten named Dobby is a 'real trooper'

Dobby has third degree burns on his feet, so he needs extra pain relief and also finds comfort in his pink ducky, according to the Walden Animal Hospital. (Submitted by Mark Laporte)

The little kitten named Dobby is getting round the clock treatment at the Walden Animal hospital in Sudbury, Ont., after he was found injured following a garage fire.

The tabby was first discovered last Saturday when a fire crew went back to the location of a fire that had happened the day before.

Jesse Oshell, the acting deputy fire chief for Greater Sudbury, says firefighters often go back to make sure there aren't any problems such as hot spots smoldering. 

"They are trained to use their senses to evaluate a scene situation both while they are coming into a scene and working it and also when the go back and check on something," he said.

But when the crews went back to the site, the fire captain heard the sounds of the kitten who was hiding in nearby brush. He had dried tar all over his body, Oshell says.

"The kitten wasn't able to go any further and was kind of calling out from those bushes," he said.

The firefighters called the Greater Sudbury Animal Shelter who helped out and put them in touch with the Walden Animal Hospital who took him in.

"From the last report that we have from the Walden Animal Hospital is that they tended to him, he's eating well and making a recovery and we are hoping for the best," Oshell said.

The hospital is posting updates on Dobby's condition on its Facebook page. Staff have been giving him mineral and Dawn soap baths to try and remove as much tar as possible. Dobby suffered third degree burns on his paws and they says despite the pain from the burns he is being a "real trooper".

The third degree burns on his feet are very painful and staff are working to make sure the medicine he is receiving is working. (Submitted by Mark Laporte)

Oshell says unfortunately dealing with injured pets is part of the job.

"We do carry pet oxygen masks on our fire trucks so that if we do run into a situation where there are dogs or cats, we've even rescued birds," he explained.

At this point Dobby isn't well enough for adoption but Oshell says he believes there is already a waiting list of people willing to take him home, including some of the firefighters at the station.

About the Author

Jan Lakes

Producer

Jan Lakes is a producer at CBC Sudbury. You can reach her at jan.lakes@cbc.ca or find her on Twitter @lakesCBC.

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