Sudbury

University of Sudbury transfers Indigenous studies online courses to Kenjgewin Teg

The University of Sudbury is signing an agreement to transfer its intellectual property in certain Indigenous studies online courses to Kenjgewin Teg, an Indigenous-led educational authority on Manitoulin Island.

Kenjgewin Teg president Stephanie Roy says transfer is a gesture of 'reconciliation' with Indigenous people

The University of Sudbury announced Thursday it was transferring the intellectual property of its online courses in Indigenous studies to Kenjgewin Teg. (Yvon Theriault/Radio-Canada)

The University of Sudbury is signing an agreement to transfer its intellectual property in certain Indigenous studies online courses to Kenjgewin Teg, an Indigenous-led educational authority on Manitoulin Island.

In a press release Thursday, officials with the former federated university at Laurentian University said Kenjgewin Teg will be developing Indigenous studies programming and opening a campus at the University of Sudbury.

Kenjgewin Teg president Stephanie Roy said  in a press release that the transfer was a gesture of "reconciliation" with Indigenous people.

"It is a concrete, constructive and bold action that goes beyond symbolic gestures and words and recognizes the legitimacy of our communities to manage our education," Roy said.

University of Sudbury president Serge Miville said a dialogue between the two schools has been in place since the summer, following Laurentian University's announcement it was severing ties with its federated schools as it navigated insolvency. 

"In March, the board of the [University of Sudbury] voted to empower the French population with its university charter. But a lot of people forget that we also committed to do the same for Indigenous people," Miville said

"And this is essentially a gift of the intellectual property of the Indigenous studies that we have. So that Kenjgewin Teg can build their own Indigenous-led programming for the future of their communities and for all Canada."

Miville added that the transfer of courses was meant to allow Indigenous-led schools to dictate their own learning. 

"We will have an autonomous institution that will be able to build upon the knowledge that belongs to Indigenous communities...and they'll be able to go forward and in partnership with the U of S in the future."

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