Sudbury

Independent candidate in Sudbury says she's not doing it for the votes

Charlene Sylvestre is running as an independent candidate in the Sudbury riding. She says her dad ran in two previous provincial elections and says he's her inspiration.

Charlene Sylvestre says she is following in her father's footsteps

Charlene Sylvestre is running as an independent candidate in the Sudbury riding in the federal election. (Markus Schwabe CBC)


Charlene Sylvestre is running as an independent candidate in the Sudbury riding.

She says her dad ran in two previous provincial elections and says he's her inspiration.

Like her father, she isn't expecting to win, but hopes to just get people participating in the conversation.

"Maybe getting a different outlook, perhaps change people's perspective on certain issues. Give a new way of thinking about tackling some of our major concerns that we're facing today." 

One of those topics she wants to talk about is direct democracy, where citizens get to vote on issues as they occur as opposed to electing somebody to decide for them.

"If it's not an issue that concerns you, you don't vote. And with technology these days you can vote right from the comfort of your own home on an issue."

"My mom probably won't even vote for me"

Other issues at the top of her list are the environment, post-secondary education and health care.

"I think we should be reducing barriers for Canadians to go to school as opposed to putting them up."

In 2013, Sylvestre graduated from the bachelor of social work program at Laurentian University in Sudbury. "I still carry debt from that degree."

She currently works in the developmental field, with people with physical and mental disabilities. 

Sylvestre says the reason she is running is because she doesn't like the way things are going right now and feels this is one way of protesting.

"I'm not even looking for votes. My dad probably won't [vote]. My mom probably won't even vote for me."

Sylvestre says she is in it for the experience and learning more about how the political system is in Canada.

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