Sudbury

Environment Canada predicts hot temperatures to stay for the 'foreseeable future'

As heat warnings continue throughout the majority of northeastern Ontario, a warning preparedness meteorologist says you can expect those high temperatures to stick around.

Tips being offered by health units to stay safe during high heat

Splash pads are open in Greater Sudbury daily from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. (Tom Ayers/CBC)

As heat warnings continue throughout the majority of northeastern Ontario, a warning preparedness meteorologist says you can expect those high temperatures to stick around.

Temperatures across the region have hit the high 20s and 30s this week, prompting warnings to be put in place.

Gerald Cheng with Environment and Climate Change Canada says usually weather systems and air masses move.

"But because of this blocking pattern, things are moving quite slowly," he said.

He says that means the current conditions — in this case, hot, humid days — won't leave the area quickly.

"So that's why we're looking at a stretch of days with temperatures in the 30s," he said. "We can see that for the foreseeable future if you look at the forecast."

Cheng says the blocking pattern will keep those temperatures consistent.

Gerald Cheng is a warning preparedness meteorologist with Environment and Climate Change Canada. (Submitted by Gerald Cheng)

"We might have these little disturbances that travel along the jet stream that might give us a shower or two but if you look at the temperatures, it's not going anywhere anytime soon," he said.

He says that system is expected to stick around over the weekend and into next week.

Keeping cool

With those high temperatures in place, health units and municipalities want to encourage people to stay safe.

In Sudbury, municipal facilities that would normally be open as cooling centres are not due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The city says the community arena and the YMCA are open to the public to escape from the heat. People can go to the arena daily between 11 a.m. and 10 p.m., while the YMCA is open between 12 and 5 p.m.

Public Health Sudbury & Districts says continuous exposure to heat can cause a number of health problems, including dehydration and illnesses such as heat stroke, heat fainting or a heat rash.

Symptoms of heat-related illnesses include dizziness or fainting, nausea or vomiting, headache, rapid breathing, extreme thirst and dark yellow urine. The health unit says those at high risk include older adults, infants and young children, pregnant women or those who are homeless.

"While maintaining physical distancing, frequently visit or check-in on neighbours, friends and older family members, especially those who are chronically ill, to make sure that they are cool and hydrated," Burgess Hawkins, a manager with Public Health Sudbury & Districts said.

The health unit says to drink plenty of cool liquids, before you feel thirsty to decrease the risk of dehydration. In Sudbury, municipal beaches are open to the public but no lifeguards are on site. 

With files from Wendy Bird

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