Sudbury·HOOKED

The importance of a human connection when getting help for an addiction

A woman getting help for her addiction in Sudbury says human connection and support has been important in her recovery.

Jolene Lenius now helps others struggling with addictions

Jolene Lenius says after struggling with her own addictions, she's now helping others with theirs. (CBC Jan Lakes)

A woman getting help for her addiction in Sudbury says human connection and support has been important in her recovery.

Jolene Lenius, 39, says it's been a long process to get help. After struggling with addictions, she can now say she's two years sober.

But getting to that point hasn't been easy. Lenius says when she showed up to get help, she was treated like a person.

"You need that human connection," she said. "Trust me, when we go outside, everybody in the world just looks down or you're a ghost and that's a horrible feeling."

Instead, she was greeted and asked if she needed water or coffee and if she was ok.

"They were very patient with me," she said. "I felt very welcomed."

Lenius says she struggled with drinking for 26 years and adds her intravenous drug use led to some serious health issues she was thankfully able to overcome.

Now, she's helping others.

"Now, I have a good job where I'm working where I can help people that went through the same thing I did," she said.

"And I can help them try and see that it is possible and that you can overcome these things with the right help."

CBC Sudbury has been focusing on the opioid crisis affecting Sudbury and northeastern Ontario in our series called HOOKED. You can read and hear more about this issue online.

 

With files from Jan Lakes

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