Sudbury

Fatal Lake Wanapitei boat crash: NDP want Liberals to order inquest

The leader of Ontario’s NDP is calling on the Liberal government to support an inquest into a fatal boating collision on Lake Wanapitei in Sudbury last year.

The leader of Ontario’s NDP is calling on the Liberal government to support an inquest into a fatal boating collision on Lake Wanapitei in Sudbury last year.

But the government says there’s not a lot it can do.

Last year, three people died when a boat on Lake Wanapitei crashed into an island.

The sole survivor of the crash, Rob Dorzek, as well as the city’s firefighter union, believe communication problems between police, fire and ambulance led to a slow response and lives could have been saved.

An inquest had been called for, but last week an Ontario coroner announced an inquest would not go ahead.

Dorzek said he’s appealing the decision.

NDP Leader Andrea Horwath (right) said the Liberal government needs to can in inquest into the 2013 fatal boat collision on Lake Wanapitei in Sudbury. However, Liberal MPP and Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services Yasir Naqvi said the government is unable to intervene in this case. (CBC)
During question period at Queen’s Park on Thursday, Andrea Horwath said the Liberal government needs to step in.

“The chief coroner’s office is under the purview of this Liberal government,” she said.

“Instead of asking the families to go through more paperwork, why will this premier not do the right thing and just call for the inquest?”

However, Liberal MPP and Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services Yasir Naqvi said the government is unable to intervene in this case.

“It’s an independent, arms-length, decision-making process and it’s totally up to the coroner to make that determination,” he said.

“It’s up to the family to avail the appeal process.”

Last week, Tim Beadman, Sudbury’s chief of emergency services, described the case as a “unique” situation that took place in a “remote area” under “adverse conditions.”

He added police, fire and ambulance staff have changed the way they train for and communicate during these types of calls.

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