Sudbury·Audio

Deidre Urso remembered as ‘wonderful’ educator

Ontario Provincial Police continue to investigating this year’s first snowmobile fatality in the northeast, and they say the incident serves as a reminder for people to stay vigilant on trails.

Britt woman died in weekend snowmobile crash, OPP investigating

Ontario Provincial Police continue to investigating this year’s first snowmobile fatality in the northeast, and they say the incident serves as a reminder for people to stay vigilant on trails.

Deidre Urso was killed in a snowmobile crash this past weekend. (Lougheed Funeral Homes)
Over the weekend, Deidre Urso, 27, died in a snowmobile crash on Georgian Bay.

Police say Urso was off trail when she hit a steel pole that was used to secure a docking system.

OPP say Urso was from Britt and the mother of two worked in Sudbury as an early childhood educator with the Sudbury Catholic District School Board.

Flags are flying at half-mast at Holy Cross Elementary School in Sudbury where she used to work, and school board director Joanne Bénard said the loss is overwhelming.

“I’ve been reading e-mails from folks saying how much they appreciated having her on staff,” she said.

“She was wonderful with the children [and] a natural in the classroom.”

Urso graduated from Cambrian College in January 2014. College officials said counselling services are available for those who need it.

Reminder of snowmobile safety

Snowmobile crash rates remain a constant in the northeast. We spoke with OPP Constable Brian Bowes about about snowmobile safety in general and a snowmobile crash over the weekend that took the life of a young woman.

Urso’s death is one of five fatalities involving snowmobiles in the province this year, and the first in northeastern Ontario.

Last year, there were 21 deaths in the province.

OPP Inspector Mark Andrews said it’s frustrating that speed, unfamiliarity with the trail and going off trail remain consistent problems.

“We’ve got to the point now where people don’t hear what the message is because it’s the same message because it’s the same problem,” he said.

Andrews said police encourage drivers to get to know their vehicles and the trail before they head out.

“Make sure that they’ve taken training [and] make sure that they’re wearing the gear properly,” he said.

“Do everything we can so that the sport stays as fun as it is and it stays a family sport.”

Andrews said police are encouraged that they are seeing fewer snowmobile crashes involving alcohol, and added his advice is to treat snowmobiles like other vehicles.

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