Sudbury

Conservative candidate in Timmins-James Bay wants to see region grow

The Timmins-James Bay Conservative candidate wants to see the region grow. Kraymr Grenke was born and raised in Timmins and hopes to be a voice for the future of the area.
Kraymr Grenke is the Conservative candidate for the Timmins-James Bay riding.

The Timmins-James Bay Conservative candidate wants to see the region grow.

Kraymr Grenke was born and raised in Timmins and hopes to be a voice for the future of the area.

Grenke says his riding has a smaller population than others but the area has a lot to offer. He says it supports the province and the country through mining, agriculture and forestry. 

"I just want to see our region grow. You know, we have so much to offer in the resource sector, but also in education, also in healthcare ... so having new industry and growing industry in Timmins will definitely help all aspects of the region moving forward," said Grenke.

He says bolstering the resource sector would benefit the area and help provide more social services.

"If we're an economically sound environment we have the ability to provide supports, you know for the social [services] parts, you know, community parts of our riding also," Grenke said.

He says northern Ontario has different issues and priorities than other ridings, such as pushing resource development forward and isolation — Timmins is eight hours from Toronto, he says — which is where he has some different opinions than his colleagues in areas like Toronto and Vancouver.

"Providing social supports and ensuring that, you know, those with a smaller population, that we have the right amount of funding for the social issues also," he said.

"I would make a strong push for supporting some of the definite social issues that we do have."

And he adds that he would also make a strong push for infrastructure projects.

Grenke says when it comes to the water issues in Attawapiskat, he wants to work with the First Nation and help support their plans.

"That is the biggest thing: is that, you know what, it needs to be their plan, it needs to work for them. I don't want to swoop in and say, "okay, no, it's got to be done this way." What can I take back to the House of Commons and say, "This is what needs to happen, these are the supports we need." 

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