Sudbury

Cochrane hires conservative lobbyist to push for truck bypass

The town of Cochrane is hiring a Conservative lobbyist to help convince the province to go through with a promised truck bypass.

Previous Liberal government promised multi-million dollar road for northern Ontario town

The town of Cochrane is hiring a lobbyist to help convince the provincial government to pay for truck bypass around the northern Ontario community. (Dave Gilson/CBC)

The town of Cochrane is hiring a Conservative lobbyist to help convince the province to go through with a promised truck bypass.

The previous Liberal government committed to building a bypass around the town for trucks travelling down Highway 11, as well as those coming to and from the Detour Lake gold mine.

The idea has been around for decades with the wear and tear on local streets, but became a priority for council after a potentially deadly rollover of a sulphur dioxide truck in 2014. 

But Cochrane chief administrative officer Jean-Pierre Ouellette says so far, the PC government has only told them that the project is under review.

He convinced council Tuesday night to spend $2,500 per month, for one or two months, to hire a lobbyist to push their case at Queen's Park. 

"Not to say there's a 100 per cent degree of confidence that this will work, but I don't think it can hurt," Ouellette told council.  

"Just based on the future of the community and the damage it's created to the roads, we don't have a lot of options, we don't have a lot of options when it comes to fixing roads."

The consultant Cochrane town council is looking to hire is Andre Robichaud of Kapuskasing, who has run for the Conservatives in recent federal and provincial elections. 

About the Author

Erik White

journalist

Erik White is a CBC journalist based in Sudbury. He covers a wide range of stories about northern Ontario. Connect with him on Twitter @erikjwhite. Send story ideas to erik.white@cbc.ca

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