Sudbury

Ontario PC leadership candidate Caroline Mulroney talks northern policy in Sudbury

Ontario Progressive Conservative leadership candidate Caroline Mulroney says she would increase funding for the Northern Ontario Heritage Fund Corporation and prioritize infrastructure in northern Ontario if she were to lead a PC government.

Mulroney to visit five northern Ontario communities in the coming days

Ontario Progressive Conservative candidate Caroline Mulroney visited Sudbury on Monday to talk about her plans for northern Ontario. (David Donnelly/CBC)

Ontario Progressive Conservative leadership candidate Caroline Mulroney says she would increase funding for the Northern Ontario Heritage Fund Corporation and prioritize infrastructure in northern Ontario if she were to lead a PC government.

Mulroney was in Sudbury on Monday morning to talk about her plans for northern Ontario and to kick off a tour of the region.

She plans to meet with supporters in Sault Ste. Marie, Kapuskasing, Timmins and Thunder Bay over the next few days.

"I think the policies of the Wynne Liberals have been incredibly hurtful and detrimental to the economy and to the people in the north," she said.

"There are a number of issues that we need to focus on and the best way to do that is to elect a PC majority government so that there's a strong voice across the north at Queen's Park for what matters to people here."

Mulroney said she would allocate $200 million annually to the NOHFC — double the amount promised in the party's official platform that was released in November.

Mulroney was joined by Parry Sound - Muskoka MPP Norm Miller in Sudbury. She plans to visit a total of five communities in northern Ontario to meet with supporters. (Robin De Angelis/CBC)

The NOHFC offers financial assistance to projects in the north to stimulate economic development.

"It's a symbol of what we really need to do to get the north back on track, to develop the north," she said.

She added that any unspent funds would roll over to the next fiscal year and eligibility criteria for the program would be rewritten.

Mulroney also spoke about improving northern infrastructure, for everything from health and education, to broadband internet and clean drinking water.

'I represent something new'

There are now four candidates, in addition to Mulroney, who are vying for leadership of the Ontario PC Party. Christine Elliott, Doug Ford and Tanya Granic Allen are all in the running.

Former leader Patrick Brown made news on Friday when he officially entered the race as well.

Mulroney said after everything that's happened over the last few weeks, the case for new leadership is even stronger now.

"I am the best candidate for the job because I represent something new, a new approach to government," she said.

"We need to make decisions that are in the long-term best interest of Ontarians, not based on political calculations.

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