Saskatoon

Winter garden? 'Y' not, says Saskatoon riverfront developer

Saskatoon has been dreaming big about a prime piece of river front property affectionately known as Parcel Y for a long time, and even as the pragmatic work moves forward, the dreams continue.

City Hall gets animated view of Parcel Y

A preliminary rendering of the Alt Hotel to open in River Landing in Saskatoon. (submitted by Lemaymichaud Architecture Design)

Saskatoon has been dreaming big about a prime piece of river front property affectionately known as Parcel Y for a long time, and even as the pragmatic work moves forward, the dreams continue.

They want this site to be public.- Alan Wallace

At City Hall yesterday, planning commission members witnessed an animated aerial fly-through of the $300-million dollar, three-tower development that may someday grace the riverfront.

"It was interesting to see the buildings, their form and intent of the full development of the site," said the city's director of planning and development Alan Wallace.

The plan for a hotel and condo development, along with office space is well-known. But along with the dream-like fly-through of the imagined project, there is a new idea.

Wallace said that for the first time, there was talk of a winter garden at the very top of a 20-storey office tower to be built in later stages of the development. 

"They want this site to be public; they want this site to be accessible and friendly and open, they want, obviously, people to come and frequent the site."

Wallace said the planning commission had some question about the amount of office space that will eventually come to Parcel Y, but he said he sensed no skepticism about the viability of the plan. After a handful of failed ideas for Parcel Y, Wallace believes this one will happen.

"Absolutely, you will see the hotel. They will start digging this year."

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