Saskatoon

Canada's longest-running archeological dig site will run a little longer this summer

The Wolf Willow excavation site at Wanuskewin Heritage Park will be on display for visitors for an extra two months.

Excavation site at Wanuskewin Heritage Park opens for an extra 2 months for visitors

A bison phalanges (finger bone) unearthed by U of S students during an archeological dig at the Wolf Willow site at Wanuskewin Heritage Park. (Victoria Dinh/CBC)

You'll have a bit more time to dig into history at Canada's longest-running archeological dig site this summer.

For the first time, an excavation site at Saskatchewan's Wanuskewin Heritage Park — an area near Saskatoon that has produced archeological finds dating back over 6,000 years — will be on display for visitors for the months of July and August.

"We're going to have this open for the next couple of months, including on weekends, so we can accommodate other visitors who couldn't, for whatever reason, come in May and June," explained lead archeologist Ernie Walker.

Lead archeologist Ernie Walker says visitors will get the opportunity to handle artifacts at the Wolf Willow excavation site. (Victoria Dinh/CBC)

Walker said that since 1982, the active excavation sites at the park were only open for public viewing during the months of May and June because that period coincided with the University of Saskatchewan's archeological field school.

This year, when the U of S students leave, there will be a tour guide available to walk visitors through the archeological site.

Students from the University of Saskatchewan’s archeological field school are actively excavating during the months of May and June. (Victoria Dinh/CBC)

According to Walker, visitors will get the opportunity to handle artifacts at the Wolf Willow excavation site.

"It won't be necessarily active digging, but you're going to see the open excavations and you're certainly going to see actual artifactual material," he added.

A set of bison teeth found at the Wolf Willow site is estimated to be about 500 years old. (Victoria Dinh/CBC)

With files from CBC radio's Saskatoon Morning

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