Saskatoon

Three Farmers harvests deal from CBC's Dragons' Den

The first time the Vandenhurk sisters earned a deal on CBC Television’s Dragons’ Den with their Three Farmers culinary oil, things just didn’t work out. So when the show offered a second chance, they jumped at it.

Culinary oil makers expand line and land new royalty deal

Three Farmers is well-know for its culinary oils, which some describe as tasting like Saskatchewan. (CBC)

The first time the Vandenhurk sisters earned a deal on CBC Television's Dragons' Den with their Three Farmers culinary oil, things just didn't work out. So when the show offered a second chance, they jumped at it. 

Last week, they pitched an expanded line of products.
Elysia Vandenhurk is chief operating officer and part owner of Three Farmers, a Saskatchewan company that has appeared twice on CBC TV's Dragons' Den.

"It kind of seemed like they were fighting over us a little bit," Elysia Vandenhurk, Three Farmers' chief operating officer and part owner told CBC Radio's Saskatoon Morning.

"So it turned out really well."

After their latest appearance, the Vandenhurks accepted a royalty deal involving three of the Dragons.   

Their company, Three Farmers, has been selling cooking oil made with camelina, an ancient grain. In trying to describe the product some have said it tastes like Saskatchewan. Vandenhurk has a slightly more accurate description of the flavour.

"To me personally, I get almost like a snow pea or asparagus sort of flavour."

Three Farmers now offering snack food

The Saskatoon-based company is now doing much more than producing oil.

Three Farmers now offers roasted chickpea and green pea snacks, all while working to maintain the company's commitment to natural, sustainable, healthy and easily traceable products.
Three Farmers now has a line of snack foods in addition to oils. (CBC)

Vandenhurk said that what they're trying to "foster a relationship again with farmers and consumers."

Everyone involved with Three Farmers is anxious to work with the Dragons, to see if they can build on their success and bring their products to a wider market.

Still, Vandenhurk said, they all recognize there are many challenges ahead.

"Every day is unknown, every day is ever changing."