Saskatoon·Photos

La Loche tragedy unfolded: a Saskatchewan town in crisis following school shooting

La Loche, Sask., has a suicide rate three times the national average. Residents say that they need resources to create opportunities to lower suicide and addiction rates.

CBC has been on the ground in La Loche, Sask. since Jan. 22 when a gunman shot 11 people, killing 4

Church members console each other outsuide church after a mass in La Loche, Sask., on Sunday January 24, 2016. Four people were killed Friday in shootings at a local school and a home in the small town. (Jason Franson/Canadian Press)

The devastation in La Loche, Sask. this weekend has left a community reeling from the loss of four young people.

Two brothers were gunned down at this home before the school shooting on Friday, January 22.

The scene on Saturday outside of the La Loche home where the fatal shooting took place. (Matt Kruchak/CBC)

The suspected shooter, 17, sent this message to his friends. 

The suspect sent this message after the first shooting. (THE CANADIAN PRESS)
 The brothers are Drayden Fontaine, 13 and Dayne Fontaine, 17.

Shortly before 1 p.m. CST police received frantic calls from La Loche Community School with reports that there was a shooter inside.

La Loche Community School in northern Saskatchewan. (Canadian Press)

Students and teachers ran for safety, many hiding in locker rooms. 

The outside of La Loche Community School in northern Saskatchewan is shown on Jan. 22, 2016. (Joshua Mercredi/CP)

Police arrived approximately 10 minutes after the first calls came in. When they arrived, the outside door had been shot and they could see the shooter inside the building. 

Police tape surrounds the La Loche Community School in La Loche, Sask. where the fatal shooting took place. (Matt Kruchak/CBC)

At 1:15 p.m. CST the shooter surrenders. Eleven people have been shot. 

Police investigate the scene on Saturday, January 23, 2016 of a Friday shooting at a school in La Loche Sask. The shooting left four people dead. (Jason Franson/Canadian Press)

Marie Janvier, 23, an educational assistant, dies on scene. 

Aunt Diane Janvier says Marie's smile could light up a room. (Diane Janvier)

Adam Wood, a 35-year-old teacher has also been shot. He is rushed to hospital, where he dies from his extensive injuries. 

The young man was originally from Uxbridge, Ont., and had moved in the fall to start his teaching career. (Facebook)

Seven people are critically injured in the attack are rushed to Royal University Hospital in Saskatoon. 

Members of the community come out to watch Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall speak in La Loche, Sask., on Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016. A shooting Friday left four people dead. (Jason Franson/The Canadian Press )

La Loche, a community of 3,000 people, is left in shock.


"I feel like I'm in a nightmare and I want to wake up," said Diane Janvier, the aunt of Marie Janvier.

Church members console each other outsuide church after a mass in La Loche, Sask., on Sunday January 24, 2016. Four people were killed Friday in shootings at a local school and a home in the small town. (Jason Franson/Canadian Press)

Many are left wondering how a tragedy like this could have happened.

Hundreds gathered at La Loche Community Hall for candle vigil and prayer gathering on Sunday night. (Devin Heroux/CBC)

But La Loche has experienced more than its fair share of loss.

The town has the highest suicide rate in the country, almost three times the national average. 

A man holds a rosary as police investigate the scene of a shooting at the La Loche Community School in norther Saskatchewan on Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016. The shooting took place on Friday, leaving four people dead. (Jason Franson/Canadian Press)

In a four-and-a-half year period from August 2005 to January 2010, 18 people ended their lives in the community, while many more attempted suicide. 

The shootings Friday took place at two locations in the community. (Canadian Press)

Don Herman is mourning the loss of his nephews, Dayne and Drayden Fontaine. 

"These two young kids, they didn't even start their life and they're gone," he said.

"We need somebody to tell us, 'Oh, this is the stuff you're going to be feeling, it's natural to feel stuff like that and these are the things you need to do,' or 'these are the steps you have to take in order for you to move on,'" said Don Herman. He lost two nephews in the La Loche shooting.

The country mourns with the community of La Loche, as politicians and community leaders come together.

A memorial grows as more people leave flowers and candles in front of the La Loche Community School in La Loche, Sask. (Jason Franson/The Canadian Press)

Premier Brad Wall and Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale arrive and meet with the community.

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall led a delegation of provincial and national leaders and officials who met with people in La Loche, following shootings Friday in which four people were killed and seven others are in hospital in critical condition. (Matt Kruchak/CBC)

"It's a good people community. I know that," said one resident."It's only that we need a few things that need to happen."

Residents console each other at the memorial near the La Loche Community School in La Loche, Sask., on Sunday. January 24, 2016. A shooting Friday left four people dead. (Jason Franson/The Canadian Press)

They all hope for a better La Loche.

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