Saskatoon

Support workers reject latest offer from U of S

Nearly 2,000 support workers at the University of Saskatchewan aren't happy with the latest offer from their employer.

Workers won't be in legal strike position until essential services hearings complete

According to the union, the university said it planned to make changes to the pension plan without any input from the workers. (Bridget Yard/ CBC)

Nearly 2,000 support workers at the University of Saskatchewan aren't happy with the latest offer from their employer.

On Wednesday, the union local representing the workers said it had rejected the university's latest offer.

"The University of Saskatchewan continues to force CUPE Local 1975 needlessly towards job action," said union local president Craig Hannah in a news release.

"We firmly believe that our members deserve a say in their retirement security and that all changes to the pension plan should be negotiated at the bargaining table."

The main sticking point between the two sides remains changes to the workers' pension plan, moving away from a defined benefit plan.

According to the union, the university said it planned to make changes to the pension plan without any input from the workers.

"Our pension plan is the most cost-effective pension plan per employee on campus, and costs less than one per cent of the operating costs of the University," said Hannah.

The five-year proposal offered a wage freeze over the next three years, with a two per cent increase in years four and five.

The union said the proposal also includes a $3,000 signing bonus, which is not available to students or casuals.

Currently, both sides are involved in essential services hearings. The union said a strike vote cannot be held until those hearings are completed.

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