Saskatoon

Association says weak dollar isn't attracting film industry back to Saskatchewan

The president of the Saskatchewan Motion Picture Industry Association says more needs to be done to bring film productions back to the province.

Film association says more grants, film workers needed to attract productions

The film WolfCop was filmed in Saskatchewan. (Creative Saskatchewan)

The president of the Saskatchewan Motion Picture Industry Association says more needs to be done to bring film productions back to the province.

While the low Canadian dollar has brought many film and TV projects to neighbouring Alberta and Manitoba, the province's film association says Saskatchewan is being left behind.

The Saskatchewan Motion Picture Industry Association (SMPIA) said many of the province's film crews left after the provincial government cut Saskatchewan's film tax credit in the 2011-12 provincial budget. 

"In order for people to choose our industry as a career, to return to it from other jobs, or to move back to Saskatchewan, they really need some assurance of consistent work," said SMPIA president Nova Alberts.

While the provincial government created the funding agency Creative Saskatchewan as a replacement, Alberts said it hasn't filled the gap.

"We need Creative Saskatchewan to be out there, bragging about what we have, and encouraging investors to consider Saskatchewan with all the tools and all the assets, including a competitive incentive program that they have in their back pocket," she said.

While Alberta has a similar film grant system to Saskatchewan, SMPIA said the neighbouring province puts a lot more money into the film industry. It offers $25 million in film grants every year. Saskatchewan offers $5 million for all creative ventures in the province, everything from music to theatre to film.

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