Saskatoon

Saskatoon group joins effort to deliver menstrual supplies to northern Sask.

They call themselves Moon Time Sisters and their mission is to let girls in northern Saskatchewan know "they have a whole province of women behind them who want to see them succeed."

Moon Time Sisters wants to 'support our young women in the north'

A lack of access to feminine hygiene products in northern Saskatchewan is forcing some girls to miss school, according to the local member of Parliament. (CBC)

They call themselves Moon Time Sisters and their mission is to let girls in northern Saskatchewan know "they have a whole province of women behind them who want to see them succeed."

The Saskatoon-based group is doing that by collecting menstrual supplies and putting together care packages to send up north.

The Moon Time Sisters have started a Facebook group, and they've set up collection points in Saskatoon, Regina and Prince Albert.

The idea came after the group heard about a similar effort in Regina focused on reusable menstrual cups. Moon Time Sisters member Nicole White said they don't work for all women, so the group is collecting donations of all types of menstrual supplies.

"I think folks see this as a simple, productive way to support our young women in the north," said White. "I worked in non-profit for many years, so I know feminine hygiene products are a luxury for women and I want to do what I can to support young women."

Nicole White is helping to organize an effort to send much needed menstrual supplies to high school girls in northern Saskatchewan. (CBC)

White said that the immediate goal for the Moon Time Sisters is to put together five care packages that can be sent to five different northern communities, with an emphasis of reaching high school girls.

"Some of those communities don't even have convenience stores and as women, we've all been there in a pinch when we need that corner store."

The group does, however, have a much larger goal in mind. White said it would like to develop a system to support girls for as long as there is a need.

"We are trying to actually get some commercial suppliers so there is going to be sustainable access [for] these communities," she said.

With files from CBC Radio's Saskatoon Morning

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