Saskatoon engineer who helped improve energy efficiency in homes named to the Order of Canada

A Saskatoon engineer who was a key driver in energy efficiency and conservation in homes is being made a member of the Order of Canada on Friday.

Harold Orr's ideas on super insulation and air sealing have been adopted around the world

Harold Orr is one of the engineers who worked on the Saskatchewan Conservation House built in Regina in 1977. (CBC Saskatchewan)

A Saskatoon engineer who was a key driver in energy efficiency and conservation in homes is being made a member of the Order of Canada on Friday.

Harold Orr was part of a team that put together the Saskatchewan Conservation House project back in 1977, during an acute energy crisis. The team from the Saskatchewan Research Council was tasked with building a solar house that could withstand Saskatchewan's cold winters and hot summers.

The house in Northwest Regina was one of the first buildings to combine airtightness, super insulation and a heat recovery system.

That house served as a model and led to national energy conservation protocols for Canadian buildings.

The building techniques have now been adopted all over the world.

Saskatchewan Conservation House built in 1977 (Photo courtesy Harold Orr)

Governor General Julie Payette will invest seven Officers and 28 Members into the Order of Canada at Rideau Hall in Ottawa Friday morning.

The Order of Canada is one of our country's highest civilian honours.

It was created in 1967 to recognize outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation.

Almost 7,000 people from all sectors of society have been invested into the Order.

The investiture ceremony will be streamed live online at www.gg.ca/en/live.

with CBC files

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.