Saskatoon

Sask. Premier Brad Wall promotes Energy East pipeline in Toronto

Premier Brad Wall delivered a speech in Toronto today in support of Energy East. The proposed $15.7-billion pipeline would transport western Canadian oil to refineries in eastern Canada and a marine terminal in New Brunswick.

Wall delivers speech in Toronto

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall spoke with members The Empire Club of Canada in Toronto today. (CBC)

Premier Brad Wall delivered a speech in Toronto today in support of Energy East to an audience of business, labour, education and government leaders.

Energy East is a proposed $15.7 billion pipeline that will transport western Canadian oil to refineries in eastern Canada and a marine terminal in New Brunswick.

Despite the price of oil being below $50 a barrel, Wall explained there is a need and demand for pipelines and that Energy East would reduce Canada's dependency on foreign oil.

The premier admitted that pipelines are not perfect, but that they are a safer option than rail cars.

"When you move oil by rail, you're four-and-a-half times more likely to have a spill," said Wall at the Empire Club of Canada.

He also touched on the issue of climate change, arguing Energy East would not harm the environment. 

"If we shut down the energy sector in Canada, you eliminate 192 megatonnes of emissions. Meanwhile, coal plants in China emit 4000 for coal," said Wall.

NDP concerns on speaking engagements

Interim NDP leader Trent Wotherspoon accused the province of "rubber-stamping" a Chinese state-owned company's application to open a potash mine near Southey. (Neil Cochrane/CBC)

Saskatchewan NDP leader Trent Wotherspoon was skeptical last week of the premier's trip to eastern Canada. 

He hoped Wall's speaking engagements would not inflame the situation.

"As opposed to engaging those that have concerns in a serious way, in a respectful way, in a strong way that represents Saskatchewan," Wotherspoon said.

Wall said the pipeline is expected to generate $55 billion in economic benefits in Canada, including $4.3 billion in Saskatchewan and $9.3 billion in Quebec.

It will create more than 14,000 construction jobs and more than 3,300 permanent jobs when operating, he said.  

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Eric Anderson

Freelance writer

Eric Anderson is the communications leader for Sherbrooke Community Centre in Saskatoon and creator of the podcast YXE Underground. He spent nearly eight years with CBC Saskatchewan.

With files from Waqas Chughtai

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversationCreate account

Already have an account?

now